Living in Luxury is Not a Pipe Dream


Living-in-luxury

 

Living in Luxury!

Observing the lifestyles of the rich and famous is a fun pastime for many of us. We dream of how cool it would be to live in the lap of luxury as they do. Fancy cars, premium restaurants, exotic vacations, mansions . what a life they lead! But, for most people, this dream is quickly followed by the thought not for me. And often some sort of condemnation of the rich follows to soothe our wounded ego because of how we’re not able to achieve what they have. 

Several serious fallacies surround the idea that what the rich and famous have cannot be achieved by most other persons. The ideas of scarcity and the moral wrongness of wealth are two of the primary culprits perpetuating the idea that a life of luxury is a pipe dream. The universe is abundantly overflowing with all that is needed for everyone it is individual thinking and feeling that directs the flow. If you believe in lack, lack is what you will get. If you believe in the infinite abundance and love of the universe, that is what you’ll get. The idea of the moral wrongness of having or acquiring great wealth and luxury is absurd in the face of a universe of unending supply. 

Dare to think outside of fear-based, limited supply ideas. You can live a life of luxury. There is no wrong in achieving a comfortable and abundant life. Your life is your responsibility. Your neighbor’s life is your neighbor’s responsibility. This is what makes giving to others and gratitude for what you have so rich. Giving to others is not an obligation, it is a choice motivated by love. Gratitude for what you have and what you receive will grow what you receive. Living in luxury can be yours if you choose it. By allowing yourself to enjoy that luxury without guilt, you are simultaneously allowing others the same right. In other words, you are loving others as you love yourself.

The Easiest Way To Achieve Happiness


In most people there is a deeply seated fear that prevents us from taking control of our lives and shaping them to suit us. It is a fear that keeps us average, keeps us doing all the same things everybody else is doing, simply because it is the familiar thing to do.

The fear of the unknown.

You probably know that exact feeling I’m talking about. That flutter in your stomach, that vague discomfort when you get close to the edge of familiarity, that warning in your head that can be so easily misinterpreted as a valid red flag. You know what I mean.

There are parts of our minds and natures that have a single purpose: To keep us safe. These parts are trained throughout our lives to discern between what is okay, and what is dangerous. When you accidentally touched the hot stove burner or iron as a child, that safety center learned from that. When you strayed too far from your parents and they called you back with that tone of worry and fear in their voices, that safety center in your head heard it and learned. Unfortunately, most people’s safety centers have gone a little too far in their learning. The lesson you probably internalized was if it is unfamiliar, it could be dangerous. Only trust the things you know.

The result of this, is that when you get too close to the edge of what’s familiar, your brain sends off all the same warning signals and red flags that it would if you absentmindedly got too close to the hot stove. It’s there to protect you, but it also is keeping you fenced into a safe little circle away from opportunity and growth.

What can you do about this?

Some people can break through this fence, ignore the warning signals, and seek new opportunities. There is a rush associated with this behavior that beats any drug. It’s precisely that feeling of danger that provides the rush. Unfortunately, most of us can’t bring ourselves to fling ourselves headlong through the fence (or at least not very often), so is there an alternative for the rest of us chickens out here who are not happy in the fence, but not impulsive enough to throw caution to the wind?

Yes. We have to make the unfamiliar feel familiar.

That may sound strange, but it is very possible. It takes no money, no special skills, just a few minutes each day. The only thing you need for this simple technique is your imagination.

Sit down somewhere quiet for a few minutes (if you have rambunctious children or a crazy schedule, you might have to do this in bed each evening or even when you have a few minutes to yourself in the bathroom). Close your eyes and think about the thing that has been scaring you. Don’t worry about the fear of even thinking about it. In the privacy of your imagination, you are totally safe. Imagine step by step, doing the activity that has been giving you the flutters. At each step, stop and ask yourself what could go wrong at that point, how likely that really is, and what you can do to avoid the problems. What you are doing is looking around for the monsters outside the fence and seeing if there really is any danger to worry about. Once that is done, you can imagine yourself doing the steps to your goal, visualizing in vivid detail each bit as if you were actually doing it.

The results of this technique is that you can do something over and over again as many times as you need to until it becomes so familiar that there is no fear involved. What you are doing is essentially extending the fence to include wherever you want to go. This is something you can do again and again, making the fence bigger and bigger to include anyplace you wish. The biggest benefit is that rather than throwing yourself headlong through the fence and then possibly discovering all those problem and monsters that you mind had been warning you were there, once you have already committed yourself, instead you get to scope out the terrain bit by bit, and by the time you meet an obstacle, you generally saw it coming and already know what to do about it.

There are some people out there who have no fear of the unknown, and who can simply decide logically what they want to do and do it (I know, my mother is one of those people), but for the rest of us, this little technique can take the fear and trepidation out of the unfamiliar. Give it a try, I’ll think you will like the results.

Money Can NEVER Buy You Happiness


I am sure there will be many people who read this article and will think I am rather mad. Quite frankly I do not care. In this article I write about what in my humble opinion are the most importants things in life, health and happiness.

All that most of my friends talk about is money:

What car do you drive?

How much is your house worth?

How much do you earn?

How much did your suit cost?

Where are you going on holiday this year?

I find all of this very boring and think that they are rather sad. They seem to be in some sort of competition and they are basically obsessed about money.

I will give you an example of one such friend, his name is John. He never seems to talk about anything else and is always looking into get rich quick schemes. He is also in a lottery syndicate, of which there are about fifty members. Each member pays around ten pounds in per week. John likes to go out socialising on a Saturday night, however soon gets itchy feet at the time of the lottery draw. A few minutes later he will go to the toilet where he will then phone his girlfriend. He takes with him to the toilet a piece of paper with his numbers on and a little pen. After his girlfriend has told him which numbers were drawn, John will then then spend around twenty minutes checking his numbers, and then re-checking to see if he has any winning lines.

Eventually he returns to the group who seem very keen (apart from me) to find out how much he has won/lost. To date he has only won small amounts, however is convinced that one day he will become a millionaire. He will then start talking about the lottery, asking other people what they would buy if they were lucky enough to ever win. At this point I become very bored and start to wish I had stayed at home and watched the football.

For me the two most important things in life are health and happiness. These are two things which money can not buy. A few years ago, my dad was taken ill. He was in a real bad way and had to spend around five months in hospital. Him being ill was a huge shock to me as he was only fifty-seven. I feared the worst, even though I was trying my hardest to think and stay positive. I remember thinking, if I gave those doctors everything I own in the world, it still would not help him. I felt powerless and at that moment realised that money is only paper.

Happiness is the same, I remember at the age of twenty-one having lots of money and had been surprised that I was depressed at the same time. At other times I have had next to no money and have been extremely happy.

41 Things I’m Bitter About


Originally posted on Ben's Bitter Blog:

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So I heard it was your birthday…

It is again that time of year when I get to celebrate all the people asking me stupid questions like, “What are you going to do today?” and “What kind of cake do you want?” and “What presents did you get?” and “How can I annoy you the most today on the day that you want to be annoyed the least?”.   “How can I make the day that you used to look forward to be the day you dread the most?”.  “What cheesy phrase can I spit out from my arsenal of cheesy phrases that will make you groan the most?” I have several other questions that I just can’t wait to hear, but I’m hoping that you are smart enough to figure out the point by now.  If not, I have a super deep hole you can jump in that will…

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